Silent Sunday

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Purple Finch, male.

Purple Finch, female.

Mallard, female.

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Notre Dame de Paris

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Following are some photos of Notre Dame de Paris I took in 2014.

Notre Dame de Paris , March 27, 2014.

Notre Dame de Paris, March 26, 2014.

Notre Dame de Paris, March 26, 2014.

Notre Dame de Paris, March 27, 2014.

North Rose in Notre Dame de Paris, March 26, 2014.

Butterflies (Yellow) Magnolias

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Our Butterflies Magnolia tree is in full bloom, covered with flowers and hardly any leaf.

Butterflies Magnolias.

Butterflies Magnolias.

I planted the tree near the bird feeder, which is why many birds perch on its branches while waiting for their turn. They also tend to land on it as a place to break apart the sunflower seeds they pick out from the feeder.

Carolina Chickadee.

Goldfinch.

Today I noticed some birds that resemble House Finches. Looking them up at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology web site, it turns out they are Purple Finches. These birds are losing out to the House Finches which came to the East Coast after they were brought to New York City in the 1950’s. Between 1966 and 2014, populations of Purple Finches have declined by 52%!

Male Purple Finch.

Female Purple Finch.

Male Purple Finch.

Here’s a photo of a House Finch on the same Magnolia tree.

Male House Finch.

Yellow Magnolia, Bluebird, Egg

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Our yellow Magnolia tree flowers late, and has managed to attract Bluebirds for the second year in a row.

Bluebird on yellow Magnolia branch.

The Bluebird, or its partner, checked out one of the birdhouses I put up.

Bluebird checking out birdhouse.

However, there is no sign yet that the birdhouse is occupied by any bird.

Meanwhile, during a walk around Colonial Lake, I saw an abandoned Canada Goose egg on the ground, near the water. It was quite big, but there was no Canada Geese around it.

Abandoned Canada Goose egg.

Canada Goose egg.

One can see many Canada Geese at Colonial Lake, either swimming in the water or grazing onshore. I have no idea why this one egg was left out in the open with no mother goose tending it. Another mystery.

April Showers …

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We received a good soaking of rain yesterday, while temperatures soared into the 70’s (20’s Celsius). The Magnolias trees outdid each another to bloom and open up their flowers. We have two trees and together they have thousands of buds opening up today.

Saucer Magnolias (Magnolia Soulangeana).

Saucer Magnolias (Magnolia Soulangeana).

A Star Magnolia (Magnolia Stellata) is normally the first one to bloom, but this year it yielded to the above trees.

Star Magnolia (Magnolia Stellata).

Star Magnolia (Magnolia Stellata).

Star Magnolia (Magnolia stellata).

Star Magnolia (Magnolia Stellata).

Star Magnolia (Magnolia Stellata).

Harbingers of Spring

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American Robins don’t migrate during the winter, merely keeping out of sight most of the time. They reappear with the coming of spring, when the ground is no longer too hard for them to try to pull out worms.

American Robin, 2019 spring.

Flocks of Canada Geese flying overhead is another sign that the seasons are changing. However, I can’t figure out what they are doing since they seem to be flying in all directions.

Canada Geese flying East.

Just a minute after the above shot, those Canada Geese reversed direction and flew over me again.

Canada Geese flying West.

I thought that was the last of that flock and started walking toward the woods. Then they flew North and passed overhead once more.

Canada Geese flying North.

Another sure sign of spring is the return of Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets. They appeared two weeks ago, then went away when the weather turned cold. Now they are back.

Great Egret and Snowy Egrets at Edwin B Forsythe NWR.

Great Egret.

Finally the turtles are out sunning themselves. I think they are Diamondback Terrapins, but am not positive. They all jumped into the water as I tried to come closer to them to get a better look.

Seven turtles at Colonial Lake.

Sanderlings and Cat

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A few days ago, a flock of Sanderlings appeared to be still sleeping around 9 AM on several boulders near Barnegat Ligthouse.

Sanderlings.

Sanderlings.

Later on I saw a Tabby Cat in a wooded area not too far from where the Sanderlings were. I have seen him several times for the past three years, roaming among the trees and bushes, perhaps stalking for prey. However, the Sanderlings usually kept by the beach, so maybe the Tabby Cat was after smaller birds.

Tabby Cat near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Double-Crested Cormorants

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There are many Double-crested Cormorants at Colonial Lake. A few days ago, they took turns taking off and flying around the lake, sometimes right over my head. I had plenty of opportunities to practice camera panning to follow their flights.

Double-crested Cormorant.

Double-crested Cormorant.

Double-crested Cormorant.

Double-crested Cormorant.

Double-crested Cormorant.

Naturally all this flying around requires a lot of energy. I saw at least two Cormorants diving and coming up with fish that they promptly swallowed in a few seconds.

Double-crested Cormorants. The one on the left just came up with a big fish.

Double-crested Cormorant swallowing fish.

Early Spring Flowers

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Our region does not have too many Spring flowers yet. A few days ago, I went to Sayen Park Botanical Garden, a local park famous for the many weddings that are held there. Most of the flowers were still in hiding. Even Hellebores were still low on the ground, and among the Narcissus, the only blooming flowers were miniature daffodils like Tete-a-Tete and Jetfire.

Miniature Daffodils: Jetfire.

Miniature Daffodils.

One the other hand, there were an abundance of clusters of Japanese Andromeda, Pieris Japonica, in long pendulous clusters of red and white. At least that’s what I think they are. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Japanese Andromeda.

Japanese Andromeda.

Northern Mockingbird

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Yesterday, after I arrived at a parking lot near Merrill Creek Reservoir in Harmony township, I heard what sounded like a dozen of birds singing lustily. Looking around I only saw a single bird perched up high on an electric wire.

It was a Mockingbird, a species with a unique ability to learn other birds’ songs and sing them day and night. In the following photos, you will see that its bill was almost constantly open as it went through its repertoire. A repertoire could include as many as 150 distinct songs, and may include two groups, one for spring and the other for autumn.

Mockingbird singing.

It was not shy and let me come very close to it before flying away and landing a short distance away.

Mockingbird singing.

Mockingbird singing.

Because they sang so well, in the 19th century people caught Mockingbirds and sold them as caged birds. This nearly led to their disappearance from parts of the East Coast.

Wood Ducks

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Wood Ducks are among the most stunning ducks, rivaling Mandarin Ducks from Asia. I have been looking in New Jersey to photograph them for several years, going in vain to places where people have reported seeing them. Then yesterday, while I was taking pictures at Colonial Lake about 5 miles from home, I saw two ducks jump down from a tree onto the lake. It was a beautiful couple of Wood Ducks, and they were worth waiting for all this time!

As usual for ducks, the male Wood Duck was more striking, but the female was very pretty.

Female Wood Duck.

Male Wood Duck.

Male Wood Duck.

Male Wood Duck.

Female and male Wood Ducks.

Female Wood Duck.

Red-Breasted Mergansers

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Red-Breasted Mergansers are high energy birds that migrate in the winter to our coastline from Canada. Whenever I see them, they are always busy diving and looking for food. They have to eat 15 to 20 fish a day and must spend 4 to 5 hours every day diving for fish!

I usually wait until they surface to photograph them, and as a result they have a constant wet look with water beading all over their faces and bodies. Both male and female birds have the spiky and shaggy head prized by some young people today.

Red-breasted Mergansers, female behind male.

Male Red-breasted Merganser.

Female Red-breasted Merganser.

Female Red-breasted Merganser.

Male Red-breasted Merganser.

Bald Eagle 2019 – II

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More photos of the Bald Eagles at Colonial Lake, NJ, taken three days ago.

Bald Eagle at Colonial Lake.

Bald Eagle at Colonial Lake.

Bald Eagle at Colonial Lake.

About a week ago, Colonial Lake was stocked with 170 Trout. That may explain why Bald Eagles have been coming there to fish, although other lakes in New Jersey were also restocked with Trout, mainly for recreation fishing by humans.

Bald Eagle holding a trout at Colonial Lake.

For some reason, the half-eaten fish fell to the ground (I did not know that until much later when I passed by the tree the Bald Eagle was on).

Bald Eagle at Colonial Lake, after half eaten fish fell to the ground.

Bald Eagle starting to fly away.

Weekend Photos

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I took the following photos today while visiting the Great Swamp of New Jersey, on a very windy and cold day. There were not too many birds or animals around, but some may be good eye candy for the weekend.

Eastern Blue Bird.

Red-winged Blackbird.

Mute Swan Cygnet.

A Chipmunk ran across my path then took refuge in a tree hole.

Chipmunk.

Crab Cake

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A few days ago, while I was photographing Long-tailed Ducks, there were two or three Common Loons swimming around the same area.

Common Loon swimming near Barnegat Lighthouse.

At one point, I heard a big crunching noise. Turning toward the source of the noise, I saw a Common Loon eating part of a crab that it had caught and broken apart.

Common Loon eating crab.

It practically swallowed that part, then dipped into the water and brought up several more parts to eat.

Common Loon eating crab.

Common Loon eating crab.

Common Loon eating crab.

Common Loon eating crab.

Common Loon eating crab.

After finishing the crab, it took a drink of water and tilted its head up to swallow it and perhaps the mashed up crab also.

Common Loon swallowing.

Male Bufflehead Courtship

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Two days ago I happened upon about a dozen Buffleheads involved in their annual courtship rituals at the refuge. Male Buffeheads court their future mates by a vigorous exercise of head bobbing, diving, running on water, and flying over the head of the female ducks.

Male Bufflehead.

Male Bufflehead running toward female.

Male Bufflehead flying over female.

Male Bufflehead flying over female.

Male Bufflehead trying to impress female.

Sometimes, a female Bufflehead chased a male away.

Female Bufflehead chasing after male: “Get out of my sight, you … duck!”

Male Buffleheads competing for attention from female.

Male Bufflehead: “I am the greatest!”

Female with male Buffleheads paddling fast in background.

The courtship also took place underwater, perhaps with the males trying to prove they could be good foragers. I saw them dive and spend a minute or two submerged, but unfortunately was not equipped to take photos under water.

Bald Eagle 2019

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As temperatures today climbed above 50 °F (10 °C), I went to Colonial Lake to see if the birds responded to the sudden warmth after a long winter. At first I only saw seagulls and Mallard ducks, then just as I got back into the car to go home, two Bald Eagles appeared! They flew around the lake.

Bald Eagle flying at Colonial Lake.

Then they went to perch on tree branches and looked down on walkers, joggers, and photographers. Apparently, they had caught and eaten some fish and were just happy to sit up high and enjoy the scenery.

Bald Eagle at Colonial Lake.

Bald Eagle at Colonial Lake.

Bald Eagle at Colonial Lake.

Female Buffleheads

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Buffleheads are among the smallest ducks, one with a large head relative to the body. A small group of them was swimming near the Barnegat Lighthouse a few days ago. These ducks live mainly in North America, but may be seen in some Western European countries and Japan, but only rarely.

Female Buffleheads near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Suddenly they took off flying toward the open sea.

Female Buffleheads near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Female Buffleheads near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Female Buffleheads near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Then they began landing on the water.

Female Buffleheads near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Here are two of them swimming around, watching the humans and the other ducks and loons.

Female Buffleheads near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Long-tailed Ducks

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Long-tailed Ducks also breed in the Artic Coasts and winter in Northern Europe and the North Atlantic coast, although New Jersey, Delaware, and parts of Maryland are as far South as they will go. There were many of them yesterday near Barnegat Lighthouse. They swam back and forth during the time I spent there, providing many opportunities for photographs.

Male Long-tailed Duck near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Female Long-tailed Duck near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Female and male Long-tailed Ducks near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Just before I left, a male Long-tailed Duck flew around several times, at least three, calling out constantly, perhaps reminding all the other ducks that migration time was fast approaching. It was quite a show and a photographer’s dream.

Male Long-tailed Duck flying and calling near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Male Long-tailed Duck flying and calling near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Male Long-tailed Duck flying and calling near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Male Long-tailed Duck flying and calling near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Brants

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A Brant is a relatively small goose that breeds on the Artic coasts of Western Siberia, Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. In late fall, they migrate to Western Europe from Siberia. In North America, they fly down from Alaska and the upper reaches of Canada to the Pacific and Atlantic coasts, at times making non-stop flights that could be as long as 1,000 miles (1,600 km) or more. While the Pacific and European Brants have black bellies, the Atlantic Brants that I see have white ones.

Atlantic Brant.

Atlantic Brants near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Yesterday, as temperatures climbed to the 50’s (10 °C) I went to Barnegat Lighthouse State Park where the Brants put on quite a show in preparation for their impending flight back to their breeding grounds.

Atlantic Brant near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Atlantic Brants near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Atlantic Brants near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Atlantic Brants landing on water near Barnegat Lighthouse.

Monochrome Monday: Downy Woodpecker

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Overnight wet and heavy snow fell in our area, bending and sometimes breaking the branches of some trees. Many birds came to our feeder, among them a pretty female Downy Woodpecker that looked for insects on a nearby magnolia tree. Here is a shot of her, rendered in monochrome for this Monday.

Female Downy Woodpecker.

Miniature Horses – More Pictures

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Three years ago, when I  went to bring Jackie, the Golden Retriever, home, I saw a farm in South Jersey that raised miniature horses. Going through the photos I took at the time, there are some that have not been published yet, and one, the last one below, that can be republished.

Miniature horse.

Miniature horse with dangling barbed wire.

Miniature horse.

Miniature horses.

Monument Valley

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I have been twice to Monument Valley, a famous place used as the backdrop for many Western movies made by John Ford. It lies within the Navajo Nation, on the border of Utah and Arizona.

We got there one late afternoon in June, with the setting sun creating a wonder of light and shadows on the iconic buttes and the surrounding desolate landscape.

Sunset over Monument Valley in June 2013.

Wright Brothers National Memorial

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The Wright Brothers flew their airplane successfully on December 17, 1903 at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in the Outer Banks. Today there is a Wright Brothers National Memorial at the spot, with a visitor center, a monument, and sculptures of their bi-plane and that historic moment.

Replica of first bi-plane. Orville Wright was the pilot.

Replica of first bi-plane and first flight moment. Wilbur Wright behind the bi-plane.

The two brothers each flew their bi-plane twice that day. Their final flight covered 852 ft (260 m) before the bi-plane struck the ground and broke part of its frame.

We visited this place almost five years ago. We arrived too early, before the visitor center was open. But it was a beautiful day for photography.

Flu Season and Birds

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The flu has forced me to stay home these past two weeks and I have not gone out to take any picture, or visited your posts as often as before. The following photos are the results of my editing of recent shots of backyard birds that show some different views of the two most common visitors to our feeder in the winter.

Dark-eyed Junco.

Carolina Chickadee.

About two weeks ago, I also caught a Great Blue Heron jumping around a pond, probably on a fishing expedition.

Great Blue Heron.

Great Blue Heron.

Great Blue Heron.

Great Blue Heron.

Great Blue Heron.