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In the fall, Snow Geese migrate some 3,000 miles (4,800 km) from the northernmost reaches of Canada to as far South as Mexico. In the Spring they do it in reverse, and so we get to see them twice a year, in flocks of a few hundreds to as many as hundreds of thousands of them. In the latter case, they cover the ground like snow, and the sight of them lifting up to fly is a wonder of nature.

Snow Geese arriving in New Jersey in late February, flying high, hundreds or thousands at a time.

Snow Geese resting on a frozen reservoir. Note the Bald Eagle on lower left.

As the Bald Eagle began to fly toward them, the Snow Geese lifted up.

Snow Geese up in the air by the tens of thousands. Their flight and number confused the Bald Eagle, who gave up without catching and killing any Snow Goose, at least while I was watching.

The above photos were taken at Merrill Creek Reservoir on a bright sunny day three years ago. The following photos are more recent close ups of Snow Geese in flight. They were taken at the Edwin B Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge on an overcast day.

Snow Geese in flight. The one on the right was a juvenile. It seemed to be saying: “Not so fast you guys, wait for me!”

Snow Geese.

Snow Geese.

Snow Geese.

Snow Geese.

Snow Geese.

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