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Just before Thanksgiving, I went to look for Tundra Swans and Bald Eagles to photograph. I drove first to Maryland’s Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge, a place that is threatened with closure for lack of funding. At the present time, there is only one employee left at Eastern Neck. He told me Tundra Swans have started arriving, but only a few have, and they were staying far from the refuge coastline.

Next I went on to Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Cambridge, MD. From the Visitor Center, I could see four Tundra Swans , but it was not easy to photograph them as they were too far. The following photo shows one of them waking up from a midday nap, stretching a wing and a leg. I hope to have better images in late December or next January as the swans arrive in greater numbers at Eastern Neck NWR.

Tundra Swan among Canada Geese at Blackwater NWR.

Blackwater NWR is famous for its Bald Eagles, with some staying there all year round. This is one pair that could be seen from Wildlife Drive.

Bald Eagles at Blackwater NWR.

After watching that pair, I drove around Wildlife Drive for a second time, and found another pair, unless it was the same one above that moved to a different location. This couple was perched on a dead tree sticking out of the water.

Bald Eagles at Blackwater NWR. “Not so loud, dear!”

One of the eagles kept calling out for several minutes.

Bald Eagles at Blackwater NWR. “I will be as loud as I want!”

Finally, the one that was calling flew off.

Bald Eagle flying at Blackwater NWR.

It went in circle, looping around several times, putting on a majestic show for the visitor photographer.

Bald Eagle flying at Blackwater NWR.

Bald Eagle flying at Blackwater NWR.

Then it landed back to its perch on the dead tree.

Bald Eagle flying at Blackwater NWR.

Bald Eagle landing on perch Blackwater NWR. Note the other bird that remained at its position.

Bald Eagle landing on perch at Blackwater NWR.

Bald Eagle back on perch at Blackwater NWR.

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