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Mute swans are not native to North America and were brought over here in the 19th century from Europe for decorative purposes! They also do not migrate much, staying around most of the year, unlike other types of swans that range from the Artic Circle to warmer regions depending on the season.

Over the past several weeks I have taken pictures of mute swans at the Edwin B Forsythe Wildlife Refuge near Brigantine, NJ and at the Abbott Marhslands on the Delaware River in New Jersey.

Here’s a pair of swans at EBF, where a daily influx of ocean water makes for a much cleaner environment.

Mute Swans at Edwin B Forsythe Wildlife Refuge

Mute Swans at Edwin B Forsythe Wildlife Refuge

The following pairs were at the Abbott Marshlands.

Swans at Abbott Marshlands

Swans at Abbott Marshlands

Swans at Abbott Marshlands

Swans at Abbott Marshlands

The white feathers you see floating on the water came from the swans when they were preening themselves. The swan on the right was stretching and making some noise, even though they are called mute swans. They are only mute when compared to other swans, such as the trumpeter swan.

Swans at Abbott Marshlands

Swans at Abbott Marshlands

The above pair had a young cygnet gray in color, but I could not find it. Instead I took the following pictures of the parents as they looked for food.

Swans feeding

Swans feeding

Swans feeding

Swans feeding

 

 

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