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Sea Otters, seen mostly on the Pacific Coast from Japan to Alaska and California were almost driven to extinction as people hunted them for their fur. At one time last century their numbers had plunged from a million to several thousand. An international ban on hunting has halted the decline, and today it is estimated that there are 100,000 of them, with 3,000 on the coastline of California.

When we arrived at Moss Landing Wildlife Area, we were pleasantly surprised to see dozens of them swimming on their backs in Elkhorn Slough.

Sea Otters floating in Elhorn Slough at Moss Landing Wildlife Area.

Sea Otters floating in Elkhorn Slough at Moss Landing Wildlife Area.

Sea Otthers at Moss Landing Wildlife Area.

Sea Otters at Moss Landing Wildlife Area. The two in the middle were intertwined and twisted in the water as they swam.

Sea Otters at Moss Landing Wildlife Area.

Sea Otters at Moss Landing Wildlife Area.

Sea Otters at Moss Landing Wildlife Area.

Sea Otters at Moss Landing Wildlife Area.

Sea Otter at Moss Landing Wildlife Area. Note right leg crossed over left leg. Relaxed.

Sea Otter at Moss Landing Wildlife Area. Note right leg crossed over left leg. Very relaxed.

Some climbed ashore to rest and sleep.

Sea Otther climbing on the beach.

Sea Otther climbing on the beach.

Sea Otter turning back to look who was taking pictures.

Sea Otter turning back to look who was taking pictures.

Sea Otter resting or sleeping.

Sea Otter resting or sleeping.

This one was defintely sleeping. It did not move for a long time until disturbed by noises.

This one was definitely sleeping. It did not move for a long time until disturbed by noises.

Baby Sea Otter swimming along its mother.

Baby Sea Otter swimming along its mother.

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